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Gerard Way is bringing us a new Doom Patrol a new DC imprint

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Gerard Way Young Animal Imprint

Gerard Way (My Chemical Romance) brought us the wonderful comic book, The Umbrella Academy. He is now getting his very own mature-reader imprint for DC, called Young Animal.

Things begin in September with Way bringing us a version of the Doom Patrol. He will be writing the title and it will have art by Nick Derington. He described it as, “My take is a brand-new take. I would say, to me- it feels like a cross between, kind of the super strange things that were going on around the time of Grant Morrison and Rachel Pollack, and then it has a lot of the spirit of the original series from the Sixties. It also has this indie kind of feel like Love and Rockets. Love and Rockets is a big influence.”

I love Doom Patrol and can’t wait to see the new comic. I am also made up to hear there is a new Shade comic heading our way.

Shade, the Changing Girl, written by Cecil Castellucci and with art by Marly Zarcone, will launch in October, along with Cave Carson Has a Cybernetic Eye, co-written by Way and Rivera, with art by Michael Avon Oeming. Finally, in November, Mother Panic — co-written by Way and Jody Houser with art by Tommy Lee Edwards — will premiere, introducing the Gotham City heiress and street vigilante Violet Paige.

They all sound fantastic and I can’t wait to read them. Great to see Flex Mentallo in Doom Patrol.

Way describes the imprint as “comics for dangerous humans.” He explained that to Rolling Stone:

Aside from sounding extremely cool to me, I’d like to think that the comics exist for people that want something different or would like mature-reader takes on DCU characters. It’s also there for people that maybe don’t normally like superhero comics.

I like to think everybody is a potentially dangerous human, so one of the things about the line that was really important to me was that it really can reach more people than just a certain type of audience. The books are all constructed to be enjoyed by people that like all different kinds of books. Even the books that have superheroes in them aren’t completely superhero books. They’re all really unique. It’s interesting and different. So [dangerous humans] is a nod to the potential readers. I like to think of dangerous humans as potential readers.

Doom Patrol was a really crazy odyssey for me. It’s the most important superhero comic book to me; it kind of always has been, since when I was young reading Grant Morrison’s stuff, and then Rachel Pollack’s run. After Rachel Pollack’s run, I had really kind of moved on to more indie stuff, like Eightball and Hate by Peter Bagge. I started moving to Fantagraphics stuff, although I did read Love and Rockets early on because I had a friend who had a cool sister who collected Love and Rockets comics. But that was also my kind of gateway into Fantagraphics books.

After that, I went back when they started reprinting [Doom Patrol], and I read all the original series from the Sixties. Those early Doom Patrols were also a big influence on Umbrella Academy as well. One of the things that I took away from re-reading all of the runs is that every writer came in, and every artist came in, and they did their own take; they did their own thing. I think my starting point was Grant’s material, and then the further I got into the process, I started to draw from all of the continuity and all of the writers’ runs. I have every issue of Doom Patrol that ever existed, so there’s great things about everybody’s run, and I’m trying to incorporate all of them.

This September, in the spirit of Grant Morrison's legendary run on the series, along with other classic incarnations of the characters, writer Gerard Way and artist Nick Derington will put their unique stamp on the world's strangest heroes taking on the universe's strangest villains.

This September, in the spirit of Grant Morrison’s legendary run on the series, along with other classic incarnations of the characters, writer Gerard Way and artist Nick Derington will put their unique stamp on the world’s strangest heroes taking on the universe’s strangest villains.

An alien takes over the body of a 16-year-old bully and must face the challenges of being a stranger in a foreign land, plus the consequences of a life she didn't live. Star Wars’ Moving Target writer Cecil Castellucci and artist Marley Zarcone explore themes of madness, alienation, and the bizarre in this sci-fi thriller, with covers by Becky Cloonan. The new series hits shelves in October.

An alien takes over the body of a 16-year-old bully and must face the challenges of being a stranger in a foreign land, plus the consequences of a life she didn’t live. Star Wars’ Moving Target writer Cecil Castellucci and artist Marley Zarcone explore themes of madness, alienation, and the bizarre in this sci-fi thriller, with covers by Becky Cloonan. The new series hits shelves in October.

Writers Gerard Way and Jon Rivera, along with artist Michael Avon Oeming take readers on a strange adventure with DC Comics’ Silver Age character Cave Carson, his cybernetic eye and his college–age daughter as they travel to dark places deep in the earth and mind. Catch this new series in October.

Writers Gerard Way and Jon Rivera, along with artist Michael Avon Oeming take readers on a strange adventure with DC Comics’ Silver Age character Cave Carson, his cybernetic eye and his college–age daughter as they travel to dark places deep in the earth and mind. Catch this new series in October.

Meet Violet Paige, a celebrity heiress by day and brutal vigilante by night as she takes on the underbelly of Gotham City’s high society. Hitting shelves in November, the series is written by Gerard Way and Jody Houser with art by Tommy Lee Edwards.

Meet Violet Paige, a celebrity heiress by day and brutal vigilante by night as she takes on the underbelly of Gotham City’s high society. Hitting shelves in November, the series is written by Gerard Way and Jody Houser with art by Tommy Lee Edwards.

Via CBR

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